in vivo fly RNAi

Graphical image of tissue culture, fly pushing, and computer, and the team of people who work with them

DRSC-Biomedical Technology Research Resource

October 21, 2019

We are pleased to announce that we have been funded by NIH NIGMS to form the Drosophila Research & Screening Center-Biomedical Technology Research Resource (DRSC-BTRR). The P41-funded DRSC-BTRR (N. Perrimon, PI; S. Mohr, Co-I) builds upon and extends past goals of the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center.

As the DRSC-BTRR, we are working together with collaborators whose 'driving biomedical projects' inform development of new technologies at the DRSC. At the same time, we continue to support Drosophila cell-based RNAi and CRIPSR knockout screens and related...

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Stephanie E. Mohr and Norbert Perrimon. 9/27/2019. “Drosophila melanogaster: a simple system for understanding complexity.” Dis Model Mech, 12, 10. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Understanding human gene function is fundamental to understanding and treating diseases. Research using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster benefits from a wealth of molecular genetic resources and information useful for efficient in vivo experimentation. Moreover, Drosophila offers a balance as a relatively simple organism that nonetheless exhibits complex multicellular activities. Recent examples demonstrate the power and continued promise of Drosophila research to further our understanding of conserved gene functions.

Figure 1 from the Escobedo et al. micropublication

Micropublication relevant to TRiP fly stocks

April 9, 2019

Users of TRiP RNAi and sgRNA fly stocks take note: the Weake lab at Purdue University brought to our attention that some TRiP fly stocks carry a mutant allele of seveneless. Jonathan Zirin worked with Spencer Escobedo and Vikki Weake, as well as with folks at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center, to quickly identify the source, sequence the mutant allele, and pubilsh a micropublication so we can get the details to the community. Bottom line, as stated in the micropublication, "The presence of the sev[21]  mutation will not generally affect the use of these stocks, as the X...

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2018 Apr 13

DRSC & TRiP Workshop at ADRC

1:45pm to 3:45pm

Location: 

Philadelphia, PA, USA
The DRSC & TRiP will be hosting a workshop at the Annual Drosophila Research Conference in Philadelphia, PA. The workshop is scheduled for Friday, April 13th from 1:45 to 3:45 PM. Come hear from DRSC & TRiP leaders Norbert Perrimon, Jonathan Zirin (organizer), Claire Yanhui Hu, and Stephanie Mohr. At the workshop, you will learn about new opportunities for community nomination and experiments using CRISPR knockout and activation, as well as learn what's new and popular among our online software and database tools. There will be something for everyone -- we will provide information... Read more about DRSC & TRiP Workshop at ADRC

New stocks added to the TRiP in vivo RNAi library

January 6, 2017

The TRiP has updated and curated our list of in vivo RNAi reagents for gene knockdown in fruitflies. To date, we have produced over 13,000 stocks for the benefit of the scientific community.

Visit the in vivo RNAi fly stocks and vectors page to download an excel file with the full list of fly stocks now available for order from the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (BDSC) and the...

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Benjamin E Housden, Matthias Muhar, Matthew Gemberling, Charles A Gersbach, Didier YR Stainier, Geraldine Seydoux, Stephanie E Mohr, Johannes Zuber, and Norbert Perrimon. 10/31/2016. “Loss-of-function genetic tools for animal models: cross-species and cross-platform differences.” Nat Rev Genet. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Our understanding of the genetic mechanisms that underlie biological processes has relied extensively on loss-of-function (LOF) analyses. LOF methods target DNA, RNA or protein to reduce or to ablate gene function. By analysing the phenotypes that are caused by these perturbations the wild-type function of genes can be elucidated. Although all LOF methods reduce gene activity, the choice of approach (for example, mutagenesis, CRISPR-based gene editing, RNA interference, morpholinos or pharmacological inhibition) can have a major effect on phenotypic outcomes. Interpretation of the LOF phenotype must take into account the biological process that is targeted by each method. The practicality and efficiency of LOF methods also vary considerably between model systems. We describe parameters for choosing the optimal combination of method and system, and for interpreting phenotypes within the constraints of each method.

Screenshot of the Online Tools Overview page

Is it a hit? On mining our data sets.

July 22, 2016

The DRSC/TRiP-FGR's FlyRNAi database stores results from the many cell-based screens done since 2003 using DRSC Drosophila RNAi libraries. It also stores information about knockdown and phenotypes resulting from specific combinations of in vivo RNAi fly stocks (including our TRiP stocks and also VDRC and NIG-Japan stocks). The in vivo data includes directly deposited data and results curated by FlyBase from the literature.

Even if you are not interested to do a fly RNAi screen, these data might help you. For...

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Publication describes TRiP resources

Publication describes TRiP resources

July 8, 2016

Liz Perkins and colleagues have published a paper describing the Drosophila Transgenic RNAi Project (TRiP) at Harvard Medical School. The article, published in the November 1, 2015 issue of Geneticsdetails the TRiP production pipeline, reagents generated, state of the collection, and validation efforts.

This is a great introduction to the many in vivo RNAi resources the DRSC/TRiP-FGR provides to the scientific community.

Click...

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2016 Sep 23

Boston Area Drosophila Meeting

1:00pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

University of Massachusetts Boston

The DRSC-Functional Genomics Resources (formerly DRSC & TRiP) will be participating in the Boston Area Drosophila Meeting, which was organized by Alexey Verakas of UMass Boston and Jim Walker of Harvard Medical School. Hear about what's new in technologies and online tools at this regional meeting of experts in Drosophila research.

Search results for the term oogenesis at the Drosophila protocols portal

Beta-testing a "Drosophila Protocols Portal"

June 16, 2016

The DRSC-FGR has developed a beta version of a database and online search for protocols, the Drosophila Protocols Portal, relevant to Drosophila research. The goal is to provide a central portal for protocols distributed across the web. We collected protocols from protocol databases, lab websites, YouTube, Drosophila Information Service (DIS), and relevant journals. You can view the results by topic or search for specific terms.

Longer-term goals...

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2016 Sep 28

Functional genomics techniques in Drosophila and their potential application in non-model insects

11:45am to 12:00pm

Location: 

Orlando, FL

DRSC-FGR Director S. Mohr will be presenting in the symposium Insect Genetic Technologies: State of the Art and Promise for the Future at the International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016). Come hear what is possible in Drosophila that might be applied to other insect species. Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 11:45 am (symposium from 9:30 - 12:30).

Ian T Flockhart, Matthew Booker, Yanhui Hu, Benjamin McElvany, Quentin Gilly, Bernard Mathey-Prevot, Norbert Perrimon, and Stephanie E Mohr. 2012. “FlyRNAi.org--the database of the Drosophila RNAi screening center: 2012 update.” Nucleic Acids Res, 40, Database issue, Pp. D715-9.Abstract

FlyRNAi (http://www.flyrnai.org), the database and website of the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) at Harvard Medical School, serves a dual role, tracking both production of reagents for RNA interference (RNAi) screening in Drosophila cells and RNAi screen results. The database and website is used as a platform for community availability of protocols, tools, and other resources useful to researchers planning, conducting, analyzing or interpreting the results of Drosophila RNAi screens. Based on our own experience and user feedback, we have made several changes. Specifically, we have restructured the database to accommodate new types of reagents; added information about new RNAi libraries and other reagents; updated the user interface and website; and added new tools of use to the Drosophila community and others. Overall, the result is a more useful, flexible and comprehensive website and database.

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