Synthetic lethality

Photo of 384-well assay plates

Drosophila cell screen with DRSC reagent library contributes to identification of new therapeutic target for renal cancer

October 7, 2019

We here at the DRSC/TRiP are thrilled to see this study from Hilary Nicholson et al. published in Science Signaling.

The study provides a great example of how screens in Drosophila cultured cells can be used as part of a cross-species platform aimed at discovery of new targets for disease treatment. The work represents a collaboration between the laboratory of 2019 Nobel Prize winner W. Kaelin and DRSC PI N. Perrimon.

...

Read more about Drosophila cell screen with DRSC reagent library contributes to identification of new therapeutic target for renal cancer
Hilary E Nicholson, Zeshan Tariq, Benjamin E Housden, Rebecca B Jennings, Laura A Stransky, Norbert Perrimon, Sabina Signoretti, and William G Kaelin. 2019. “HIF-independent synthetic lethality between CDK4/6 inhibition and VHL loss across species.” Sci Signal, 12, 601.Abstract
Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene is the signature initiating event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, and causes the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α). HIF-2α inhibitors are effective in some ccRCC cases, but both de novo and acquired resistance have been observed in the laboratory and in the clinic. Here, we identified synthetic lethality between decreased activity of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) and inactivation in two species (human and ) and across diverse human ccRCC cell lines in culture and xenografts. Although HIF-2α transcriptionally induced the CDK4/6 partner cyclin D1, HIF-2α was not required for the increased CDK4/6 requirement of ccRCC cells. Accordingly, the antiproliferative effects of CDK4/6 inhibition were synergistic with HIF-2α inhibition in HIF-2α-dependent ccRCC cells and not antagonistic with HIF-2α inhibition in HIF-2α-independent cells. These findings support testing CDK4/6 inhibitors as treatments for ccRCC, alone and in combination with HIF-2α inhibitors.
flySAM

Missed us at ADRC 2018? View our workshop slides!

April 19, 2018
Thank you to all those who attended our workshop at last week's Annual Drosophila Research Conference in Philadelphia, PA, USA. It was great to talk fly stocks, cell screens, and bioinformatics with the community. We are here to help and look forward to continued feedback on the resources we are building to empower your research. PDFs of our workshop presentations are attached to this news item. The slides will help you learn more about our in vivo resources for CRISPR, new pooled cell-based CRISPR screen technology, and bioinformatics resources at our facility.  Feel free to contact... Read more about Missed us at ADRC 2018? View our workshop slides!
2018 Apr 13

DRSC & TRiP Workshop at ADRC

1:45pm to 3:45pm

Location: 

Philadelphia, PA, USA
The DRSC & TRiP will be hosting a workshop at the Annual Drosophila Research Conference in Philadelphia, PA. The workshop is scheduled for Friday, April 13th from 1:45 to 3:45 PM. Come hear from DRSC & TRiP leaders Norbert Perrimon, Jonathan Zirin (organizer), Claire Yanhui Hu, and Stephanie Mohr. At the workshop, you will learn about new opportunities for community nomination and experiments using CRISPR knockout and activation, as well as learn what's new and popular among our online software and database tools. There will be something for everyone -- we will provide information... Read more about DRSC & TRiP Workshop at ADRC
Figure 2 from Housden et al 2017 PNAS

Variable Dose Analysis: a new DRSC-supported cell screen approach that leverages existing reagents to perform robust screens

December 1, 2017

We are excited to report the publication of a paper from Benjamin Housden and colleagues describing development and use of the Variable Dose Analysis (VDA) approach. Ben developed a way to use existing TRiP shRNA plasmids originally developed for fly stock production in a new, effective approach to high-throughput cell screening.

The VDA approach is particularly useful for combinatorial approaches that are acutely sensitive to assay robustness. The screen Ben and colleagues report focused on synthetic effects in Drosophila tumor model cells.  The...

Read more about Variable Dose Analysis: a new DRSC-supported cell screen approach that leverages existing reagents to perform robust screens
Ben Ewen-Campen, Stephanie E Mohr, Yanhui Hu, and Norbert Perrimon. 10/9/2017. “Accessing the Phenotype Gap: Enabling Systematic Investigation of Paralog Functional Complexity with CRISPR.” Dev Cell, 43, 1, Pp. 6-9.Abstract
Single-gene knockout experiments can fail to reveal function in the context of redundancy, which is frequently observed among duplicated genes (paralogs) with overlapping functions. We discuss the complexity associated with studying paralogs and outline how recent advances in CRISPR will help address the "phenotype gap" and impact biomedical research.
Benjamin E Housden, Alexander J Valvezan, Colleen Kelley, Richelle Sopko, Yanhui Hu, Charles Roesel, Shuailiang Lin, Michael Buckner, Rong Tao, Bahar Yilmazel, Stephanie E Mohr, Brendan D Manning, and Norbert Perrimon. 2015. “Identification of potential drug targets for tuberous sclerosis complex by synthetic screens combining CRISPR-based knockouts with RNAi.” Sci Signal, 8, 393, Pp. rs9.Abstract

The tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) family of tumor suppressors, TSC1 and TSC2, function together in an evolutionarily conserved protein complex that is a point of convergence for major cell signaling pathways that regulate mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). Mutation or aberrant inhibition of the TSC complex is common in various human tumor syndromes and cancers. The discovery of novel therapeutic strategies to selectively target cells with functional loss of this complex is therefore of clinical relevance to patients with nonmalignant TSC and those with sporadic cancers. We developed a CRISPR-based method to generate homogeneous mutant Drosophila cell lines. By combining TSC1 or TSC2 mutant cell lines with RNAi screens against all kinases and phosphatases, we identified synthetic interactions with TSC1 and TSC2. Individual knockdown of three candidate genes (mRNA-cap, Pitslre, and CycT; orthologs of RNGTT, CDK11, and CCNT1 in humans) reduced the population growth rate of Drosophila cells lacking either TSC1 or TSC2 but not that of wild-type cells. Moreover, individual knockdown of these three genes had similar growth-inhibiting effects in mammalian TSC2-deficient cell lines, including human tumor-derived cells, illustrating the power of this cross-species screening strategy to identify potential drug targets.